Sermons on Mission

Sermons on Mission

Crossing the Road

I’m sure that, if we’re all honest with ourselves, we can think of plenty of examples where we’ve ‘passed by ‘on the other side’, as our gospel reading this morning describes it in the well-known parable of the Good Samaritan. So, as we consider this morning’s readings — how can we learn to love our neighbour more fully as Christ has taught us?

Getting our hands dirty

Often when we read scripture, we find ourselves overwhelmed with stories and images of salvation and transformation. And yet we live at a time when the Church is facing more and more challenges, and reaching less and less people, when the response in our society to the good news of Jesus Christ seems overwhelmingly negative. So, how can we be good news to those around us? What does it mean to share with God in his kingdom harvest?

A Warning Unheeded

I’m sure many of us, in all kinds of areas of life, can relate to that need to warn others — whether that warning is heeded or not. In today’s gospel passage, we find Jesus given a warning by the pharisees, to turn away from the treacherous path he is walking. What can we learn from Jesus’ response to help us live faithfully today as God’s Church?

Sharing Faith

Today’s gospel reading is one of those often used to talk about evangelism — sharing our faith with others. So, how are we called to share our faith with others? And how should we go about sharing our faith in today’s complex and sophisticated world?

Practising God’s Kingdom

Fourth Sunday of Epiphany Readings: Nehemiah 8. 1-3, 5-6, 8-10; Psalm 19. 1-6; 1 Corinthians 12. 12-31a; Luke 4. 14-21 (view all) One of my favourite and least favourite times of the week growing up was football practice. I loved playing football, having a kick around, but the first half of the practice was full of drills and exercises which I just found boring. I couldn’t wait until the excitement of the practice game at the end. Whether it’s football…

A Life Changed

Last Sunday after Trinity Readings: Jeremiah 31. 7-9; Psalm 126; Hebrews 7. 23-28; Mark 10. 46-52 (view all) One of the wonders of modern technology is ‘call screening’ — you can now see who is phoning you before you take their call. I wonder whether, for whatever reason, you ever see who’s calling and decide to ignore it. Perhaps because you know it’s a marketing call, or because you’re busy, or don’t have time for that person. I know I’ve…

Vulnerable Mission

Sixth Sunday after Trinity Readings: Ezekiel 2. 1-5; Psalm 123; 2 Corinthians 12. 2-10; Mark 6. 1-13 (view all) I’ve always been fiercely independent — my parents tell me that growing up my catchphrase was always ‘I can do it myself!’ In fact, there’s one famous story from when I must have been around five or six years old, and my parents had decided to redecorate my bedroom in our brand new house. So we went to the shops together…

The Family Business

Trinity Sunday Readings: Isaiah 6.1-8; Psalm 29; Romans 8.12-17; John 3.1-17 (view all) I wonder whether you’ve ever had one of those deep, late night conversations. The kind of philosophical conversation that takes place, usually after a few drinks, where you and those with you put the world to rights together. I can remember plenty of those kinds of conversations when I was studying — sometimes we would end up reaching a place of agreement and deeper understanding, but often…

The Game-Changing Spirit

Pentecost Readings: Acts 2. 1-21; Psalm 104. 24-36; Romans 8. 22-27; John 15. 26-27; 16. 4b-15 (view all) I wonder whether you managed to catch the Royal Wedding yesterday? It’s one of those events, depending on what kind of person you are, where you either have to catch it at all costs or you’ve been desperately trying to avoid it. As I was watching the wedding, the thing that all the TV commentators kept saying was that it was a…

A Distinctive Calling

Sunday After Ascension Readings: Acts 1. 15-17, 21-26; Psalm 1; 1 John 5. 9-13; John 17. 6-19 (view all) One of the most sacred tasks in priestly ministry is to minister to those who are close to death. I can still remember the first time I was asked to visit someone, a lady, who knew she only had a few more days to live. She was there in bed, with her daughter gathered in close to her, and there was…