Sermons by James Henley

Sermons by James Henley

By Faith

When we trust that God is actually truly good, then we can believe that God wants only the best for us. And when we see through God’s eyes, we can let go of where we are now in order to journey towards the plan that God has for us. We can live now, in the light of eternity.‬

Faith & Finance

‘How much is enough?’ — this is often our question when it comes to money, especially since we live increasingly in a world of consumerism, where we’re bombarded with messages telling us we need more. So what does a Christian attitude to wealth and money, grounded in Jesus’ teachings, look like in today’s world? Rather than focusing on the scarcity of resources, or what might happen tomorrow, how can we live our lives grounded and rooted in the generosity of God? Is it possible to live a different kind of life, set free from financial worries in order to live simply and love generously?

Crossing the Road

I’m sure that, if we’re all honest with ourselves, we can think of plenty of examples where we’ve ‘passed by ‘on the other side’, as our gospel reading this morning describes it in the well-known parable of the Good Samaritan. So, as we consider this morning’s readings — how can we learn to love our neighbour more fully as Christ has taught us?

Getting our hands dirty

Often when we read scripture, we find ourselves overwhelmed with stories and images of salvation and transformation. And yet we live at a time when the Church is facing more and more challenges, and reaching less and less people, when the response in our society to the good news of Jesus Christ seems overwhelmingly negative. So, how can we be good news to those around us? What does it mean to share with God in his kingdom harvest?

Don’t look back!

A sermon for the first Eucharist of the Revd Matt Davis as priest, and the Revd John Thorne as deacon. Why should our faith be more than routine? How can our eyes be opened this morning to the wonder of following Jesus, and the incredible opportunity that faith in Christ presents to us? How can we live for more?

The Person or the Pigs

The horrible way in which the Dursleys treat Harry, and the ways in which they get their just desserts, are of course a source of great humour. However, in today’s gospel reading we encounter someone else who is being swept under the carpet in a far more serious and dehumanising way. What can we learn from Jesus’ encounter with this man, and the responses of those in the passage, to help us to live as followers of Jesus today?

Free at last!

In our penultimate episode from Acts today, we hear about Paul and Silas, who bring freedom to an unnamed slave girl from spiritual possession, and yet, as a consequence, find themselves in a very physical captivity, as they are thrown into jail overnight. So, what does it mean to be set free? Why is it that in our time we still find ourselves enslaved in so many ways? And how can the chains which bind us today be worked loose, and their hold on us broken?

Everything Must Change

At the heart of Christianity is a claim: The claim that two thousand years ago, when Jesus of Nazareth died, he died for our sins. The claim that three days later, on the first Easter Day, he was resurrected. Is it true? Will you believe this claim that Christ was raised from the dead? And if so, what difference will it make to your life, to your world?

Filled with Fragrance

Whatever your method of choice, whether it’s exchanging cards, presents, flowers, even planning dramatic acts of devotion, as human beings we are always trying to find ways to express our adoration to one another — whether it’s our partners, our family or friends. This morning’s gospel reading features a similar act of devotion from Mary, the sister of Martha and Lazarus, as she anoints Jesus with perfume. So what is the significance of this dramatic act, and the reactions of those around Jesus? And how might we be encouraged and challenged in our devotion today?

The Gift (and Pain) of Love

In many ways I am incredibly fortunate that my parents, my mum and dad, have always been a safety net for me. Whether it was when, aged 19, I wrote off the car he had just given me a few weeks before, and Dad left a meeting in Cardiff to sort it all out and be there with me, without even a word of anger. Or whether it was when later on, when Evie was just over a year old, she was rushed into hospital and my Mum drove across Wales in the middle of the night and sat with us the whole time she was in surgery (Evie is now completely fine by the way). Today though, as we give thanks for the role our mums have played in our lives, I’m painfully aware that for many this will be a difficult day.

Bearing Fruit

Aside from beginning with some disturbing comments about blood mingling with sacrifices and falling towers — which we will also at least touch on — this morning’s gospel presents us with a parable about a fig tree which simply refuses to bear fruit, no matter what the owner attempts. So what might this picture, and Jesus’ comments, have to say to us today as we continue our Lenten journey, and prepare for our Annual Church Meeting after the service?

A Warning Unheeded

I’m sure many of us, in all kinds of areas of life, can relate to that need to warn others — whether that warning is heeded or not. In today’s gospel passage, we find Jesus given a warning by the pharisees, to turn away from the treacherous path he is walking. What can we learn from Jesus’ response to help us live faithfully today as God’s Church?